The Smithsonian is reporting:

An unusual optical phenomenon explains why the Titanic struck an iceberg and received no assistance from a nearby ship, according to new research by British historian Tim Maltin. Atmospheric conditions in the area that night were ripe for super refraction, Maltin found. This extraordinary bending of light causes miraging, which, he discovered, was recorded by several ships in the area. He says it also prevented the Titanic’s lookouts from seeing the iceberg in time and the freighter Californian from identifying the ocean liner and communicating with it. A 1992 British government investigation suggested that super refraction may have played a role in the disaster, but that possibility went unexplored until Maltin mined weather records, survivors’ testimony and long-forgotten ships’ logs. His findings—presented in his new book, A Very Deceiving Night, and the documentary film Titanic’s Final Mystery, premiering on the Smithsonian Channel at 8 p.m. on April 15—are distilled here:

The complete Smithsonian post is here.
(Thanks to Odin Maxwell for the link)
 

1 Response » to “Did the Titanic Sink Because of an Optical Illusion?”

  1. Mike F says:

    And now there’s a new theory of why that iceberg was where it was:

    An ultrarare alignment of the sun, the full moon, and Earth, [scientists] say, may have set the April 14, 1912, tragedy in motion, according to a new report.



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